It’s Not True Love if They Ask for Money

A failed relationship could give you a broken heart, but it shouldn’t leave you out of pocket. Scammers are drawn to dating sites because they know that the people on there are looking to make a personal connection, and they can use this to their advantage. The catfishing from the original documentary started on Facebook , but you can also be catfished on dating apps like Tinder, in chatrooms or even through fake video chats on Skype. If you come across a fake profile you should report it to the dating site or social network wherever possible. Where catfishing can become illegal is if the scammer uses the fake profile to trick you into sending them money. This is fraud, and it is against the law. A common tactic of dating scammers is to ask you to talk on email, text or Whatsapp, in case the dating site or app gets wise to their scam. Scam victims frequently report being asked to send money internationally to pay for an alleged visa, only never to hear from them again.

5 Ways to spot an online-dating scammer

Meeting new people is difficult for many adults. Dating sites like eHarmony and Match. Unfortunately, that same ease of connection makes online dating sites a haven for scammers. Using the information you provide, they can craft a profile designed to win your trust.

Being scammed by a romantic interest met online is now the most common This is how much money victims of dating scams reported losing. of money or a payment on the condition the mule helps them to transfer money.

Oftentimes, the con artists convince their marks to open bank accounts under the guise of sending or receiving funds. The story may be spun further, and the scammer will ultimately convince the victim to open the account in their name or register a limited liability company and allow money transfers to flow into the account. In reality, however, the fraudsters transfer stolen money into the account and instruct their unsuspecting crime accomplices into forwarding the money to accounts controlled by the fraudsters.

A recent report by the Better Business Bureau BBB said that up to 30 percent of romance scam victims in were used as money mules. Worse still, it is generally recognized that most victims are too embarrassed to come forward, so the actual losses are expected to be far higher. Obviously, romance scammers also scout for victims on social media, where, just like on dating sites, they lure victims with fake online profiles, creating attractive personas and elaborate plots.

Here are two more articles and a video about dating fraud, complete with recommendations for how to stay safe. When love becomes a nightmare: Online dating scams. FBI warns of romance scams using online daters as money mules Up to 30 percent of romance fraud victims in are estimated to have been used as money mules. Up to 30 percent of romance fraud victims in are estimated to have been used as money mules. Similar Articles.

Tell-tale signs your online date may be an online fraud

CNN — Online romance scams are growing at a dizzying pace, raking in millions of dollars from unsuspecting victims across the United States. Some of the scams drag on for months or years, and leave the victims crushed emotionally and financially. Their alleged location is never in your city — they claim to be deployed in the military, working at an oil rig overseas or a doctor embedded with international groups, the Federal Trade Commission says.

Rubbin Sarpong, 35, of Cumberland County, would allegedly “woo” his victims online and then convince them to send him money.

Posted by Garick Giroir on August 26, The scammer starts by meeting an unsuspecting victim through an online dating site or app using a fake photo as their profile pic. After developing a trusting relationship, the con artist convinces their victim to open a bank account under the guise of sending or receiving funds. Shortly after, the account is used to funnel money from any number of illegal activities. If the account is flagged by the financial institution, it may be closed and the cyber criminal will either persuade the victim to open a new account or begin grooming a new victim.

But it’s important to use good judgment.

Romance scam

M oney transfer scams occur when a scammer tricks victims into transferring money from their own bank account. This can take place in a number of ways, and our experts in bank transfer scam law have represented in a variety of cases. Common bank transfer scams include:.

Scammers are always trying to get money, goods or services out of unsuspecting been scammed on legitimate dating apps and social media sites. and ask for a wire transfer through a third party to finish the purchase, but.

A New Jersey man was arrested Wednesday for defrauding more than 30 victims after wooing them on internet dating sites. Rubbin Sarpong, 35, of Millville, New Jersey has been charged with one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, announced U. Attorney Craig Carpenito in a press release. Sarpong concocted online dating profiles mostly portraying US military personnel stationed overseas and looking for romance. The profiles were actually made up, using fictitious or stolen identities federal prosecutors in Camden, New Jersey said.

He told them he needed the money to ship gold bars to the United States, prosecutors said, but really kept it for himself and conspirators in Ghana. Sarpong posted photographs of himself on social media posing with large amounts of cash, high-end cars and expensive jewelry.

What’s a money mule scam?

By Chris Perez. After establishing virtual romantic relationships with victims on the online dating platforms and via email, the conspirators asked them for money, often for the purported purpose of paying to ship gold bars to the United States. Although the stories varied, most often Sarpong and the conspirators claimed to be military personnel stationed in Syria who received, recovered, or were awarded gold bars.

The conspirators told many victims that their money would be returned once the gold bars were received in the United States.

Unfortunately, that same ease of connection makes online dating sites a The highest warning light in the world is a request to send money.

If you thought online dating websites are on the rise, than you would be right. However, not everyone who creates a profile on these sites has honorable intentions. Most dating scams start innocently enough. Scammers contact victims via social media sites or through email, claiming common interests or a distant, mutual connection—such as an introduction at a wedding or other large gathering. Other scam artists make their fake profiles look as appealing as possible and wait from victims to reach out and begin the conversation.

Once a scammer has you hooked, the possibilities are limitless, but here are a few of the most common variations:.

Safe Online Dating

The growth of online dating has led to an explosion of catfishing and the combination of lust, infatuation or love means that innocent people can get manipulated or exploited. These relationships can go on for years and often end in tragic emotional or financial consequences for the victims. Catfishers can be driven by anything from loneliness to obsession or revenge.

They can be motivated by the desire to live vicariously through a fake persona, to extort money from a victim, to make mischief or any number of other intentions.

Online Dating. Here, the fraudster poses as a love interest on an online dating site and earns the trust of the bank transfer fraud victims. Once an.

Army Criminal Investigation Command CID receives hundreds of reports a month from individuals who have fallen victim to a scam perpetrated by a person impersonating a U. Soldier online. Soldier who then began asking for money for various false service-related needs. Victims of these scams can lose tens of thousands of dollars and face a slim likelihood of recovering any of it. Victims may encounter these romance scammers on a legitimate dating website or social media platform, but they are not U.

To perpetrate this scam, the scammers take on the online persona of a current or former U. Soldier, and then, using photographs of a Soldier from the internet, build a false identity to begin prowling the web for victims. The most common scheme involves criminals, often from other countries — most notably from West African countries — pretending to be U. Soldiers serving in a combat zone or other overseas location. These crooks often present documents and other “proof” of their financial need when asking their victims to wire money to them.

Such scams, when they involve dating sites, pose a unique challenge in the fight against impostors and identity thieves, because on such sites a dating profile is often required to conduct a search for fake accounts.

Older singles lose millions in online dating scams


Hello! Do you need to find a sex partner? Nothing is more simple! Click here, registration is free!